Technical Theater And Why We Can’t Live Without It

Theater in the round is an entirely different experience than a show on a proscenium stage, both for the audience and for the company. If your next show is in the round, here are a few blocking tips to help you achieve post-proscenium perfection: – “Stage left” no longer applies! You’re going to need to redesignate areas of the stage, because there is no “stage left” or “stage right”. It can be helpful to think of the stage as a clock and direct actors to two o’ clock instead of “stage right”. Another tactic is to use cardinal directions – north, south, east, and west – for different parts of the stage. – Play to the corners. Actors can no longer play to the back of the house – at least not in the traditional sense. Encourage your actors to consider their body movements from all angles. If audience members from at least three corners can clearly see what a given actor is doing, view more, then your blocking is a success! – Space it out. With theater in the round, it’s crucial that actors give each other more space than on a typical proscenium stage. The audiences’ sightlines can quickly become blocked unless actors are aware of how they’re blocking others. Theater in the round is a fun, exciting experience for both audience and company when done right. Use these blocking tips to ensure that your next theater in the round show is a hit!

Why Learning Lines Is What You Should Do First

When you are given a part in a play, your first priority needs to be learning lines. As you grow to feel more comfortable with your part, you will infuse your character with emotion and learn how to use facial gestures and body language to emote more effectively. However, you can’t do any of this until you have the lines down.

There are many ways of learning lines, and you have to find the method that works best for you. Some Read the rest of this entry »

Professional Theatre Is Not High School

Professional Theater – Not For the Feint of Heart
Professional theater is joyous, boisterous at time, enlightening and savage. It’s definitely not for the feint of heart. No matter which area of professional theater a thespian chooses, acting, musical scores and orchestration, costuming, props, technical staging or graphic designs, competition for the most talented is enormous. Professional Theater is not high school. There’s an opportunity to learn mainly when it pertains to technique. This is a venue that perpetually changes. For actors and others involved Read the rest of this entry »

Top schools for aspiring actors

There’s nothing as intoxicating as the theatrical life. Many great actors that you see in shows and movies on www.Cable.TV started out in the same position as you, wondering how to get into acting.

For young people wishing to become actors, however, the road to life as a professional actor can be unclear. Most professionals in the theatrical world, however, advise young actors to pursue their dreams by enrolling in a top acting school, which gives them a supportive place to hone their skills before competing in the commercial marketplace.

Here’s a roundup of some of the best-regarded acting schools for aspiring actors:

The Actor’s Studio in New York City at Pace University. This program offers classes in a university setting and offers an MFA degree. The program is modeled after the innovative work of the legendary Actor’s Studio, which was taught by Lee Strasberg and trained many film greats, including Marlon Brando, Paul Newman and Al Pacino. The Actor’s Studio is known for teaching theatrical realism via the acting “method.” Students who graduate from this program have the opportunity to audition for the Actor’s Studio in New York.

The Julliard School. This arts conservatory trains students in every aspect of theater, and provides many opportunities to work onstage, gaining valuable professional experience via an internship program. Based in New York City and affiliated with Lincoln Center, this program has launched many great careers, with alumni that include Kevin Kline and Robin Williams.

The Yale School of Drama. This graduate program, offered through Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, offers students a theatrical education through the study and performance of the classics. Graduates of this program include Meryl Streep and Frances (“Fargo”) McDormand.

The London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art. This school has been training young actors in the art of speech and drama since the late 18th century. Its graduates include many of the theatrical greats of the last many decades, and its location in London gives students an opportunity to take in professional theatre on a regular basis.

All of these acting schools require entrance auditions, and the competition can be fierce. For students who want the best, however, the hard work is undoubtably worth it.

A Winning Combination For Choosing The Right Script

A Winning Combination For Choosing The Right Script

How long has it been since you attended a good play at the theater? There are some plays that are essential to see if you want to be able to discuss them with your friends. William Shakespeare leads the way with the play, “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” This play is glorious to behold, with it’s fairies and diverse lovers. It has a storyline that is easy-to-understand. It is worth it just to see the imaginative sets and costumes.

Some plays have raw, heartfelt intensity, such Read the rest of this entry »

Working In The Theatre: What Not To Do

When people land their dream jobs working at a theatre, they are likely so excited. However, that job can get the best of them, and they might end up doing something that gets them fired more quickly than they were hired. What should you avoid doing while working in a theatre?

Do not hassle the celebrities. Remember, you are all there to work, and you need to keep the setting professional. Furthermore, do not start blabbing gossip or personal details about the actors and actresses all around town. If you are the Read the rest of this entry »

So You Want To Be An On-Stage Actor?

If you’ve always dreamed of staring in a theatrical production, it’s never too late to get working on that goal. As soon as you decide that this is what you want to do, start auditioning for roles at local theaters and playhouses. If you feel your acting is not up to par, you’ll likely need to take some classes first. Even as you are learning, volunteer as a stagehand in a local play to start getting your foot in the door.

When you’re still in school, you can take theater classes or perform in your high school Read the rest of this entry »

Why Wicked Works: Great Music And A Familiar Story

As a general rule musicals and plays that feature familiar characters or storylines tend to fair best in the popular audience. A story like Wicked is both familiar and new when it comes to a typical stage drama and it is these aspects of this play that have helped to make it so successful. Every visitor to a play or musical wants to be entertained and with a musical like Wicked you would be hard pressed to find someone that didn’t enjoy at least some part of the spectacle. Read the rest of this entry »

Understanding And Perfecting Blocking For Theatre In The Round

Theater in the round is an entirely different experience than a show on a proscenium stage, both for the audience and for the company. If your next show is in the round, here are a few blocking tips to help you achieve post-proscenium perfection:

- “Stage left” no longer applies! You’re going to need to redesignate areas of the stage, because there is no “stage left” or “stage right”. It can be helpful to think of the stage as a clock and direct actors to two o’ clock instead of “stage right”. Another tactic is to Read the rest of this entry »